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Faculty & Staff

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

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Richard Hartmann

Richard Hartmann, Ph.D.

Professor/Department Chair
rhartma0@naz.edu
585-389-2585
Peckham 235

Learn More about Dr. Richard Hartmann

Education - B.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Stephen Beecher

Stephen Beecher, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
sbeeche9@naz.edu
585-389-2581
Peckham 325

Learn More about Dr. Stephen Beecher

Education - B.S., State University of New York at Geneseo (Physics); Ph.D., University of Delaware (Low Temperature Condensed Matter Physics)

"As the resident physicist at Nazareth, I have the unique opportunity to connect our students to the wonders of the universe."

Students in my physics laboratory and courses learn the basic principles of physics and natural philosophy that took almost 500 hundred years to develop by the most interesting and gifted people. I often share my own real world experience as a nuclear trained engineer aboard the fast attack submarine, the USS Tautog in my courses. These stories serve as a springboard for my students to apply the principles of physics to everyday experiences and gain a more appreciative understanding of the physical processes that govern the world around us."

Areas of Academic Interest - My teaching responsibilities are in Physics – Introductory Physics I (PHY 207), Introductory Physics II (PHY 208), Fundamentals of Physics I (PHY 251), Fundamentals of Physics II (PHY 252), General Physics Lab I (PHY 203L), and General Physics Lab II (PHY 204L).

John Bopp

John (Jack) Bopp, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
jbopp5@naz.edu
585-389-2582
Peckham 230

Learn More about Dr. John Bopp

Education - B.S., University of New Orleans (Chemistry); Ph.D., Florida State University (Physical Chemistry)

"My colleagues and I set very high expectations, yet we are caring educators dedicated to the intellectual development of our students."

Students working in my physical chemistry courses and laboratory will explore fundamental theories of matter such as thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, quantum mechanics, and molecular orbital theory, as well as gain experience in the laboratory techniques used to study each. In addition, we also study the physical laws of sound to explain how the human ear detects sound, how the human voice produces sound, how musical instruments work, as well as other natural manifestations of sound."

Areas of Academic Interest - My teaching responsibilities are largely in Physical Chemistry and The Science of Sound – Physical Chemistry I (CHM 361), Physical Chemistry I Lab (CHM 363L), Physical Chemistry II (CHM 362), Physical Chemistry II Lab (CHM 364L), Science of Sound (SCI 167), and Science of Sound Lab (SCI 168L). I have also been involved in General Chemistry (CHM 145, CHM 146L, CHM 147, CHM 148L), Chemistry Seminar (CHM 452), Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (CHM 445), Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab (CHM 446L,) and Curriculum Methodology (CHM 457).

khutchison2Kelly Hutchinson, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
khutchi8@naz.edu
585-389-2154
Peckham 327

Learn More about Dr. Kelly Hutchinson

Education - Ph.D., Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; M.S., Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; B.S., Chemistry, Nazareth College

Bill Lammela

William Lammela, Ph.D.

Professor
wlammel8@naz.edu
585-389-2580
Peckham 320

Learn More about Dr. William Lammela

Education - B.S., Keene State College (Chemistry and Physics/Environmental Science); Ph.D., University of New Hampshire (Analytical Chemistry/Earth Science (Marine Chemistry)

"The Nazareth Chemistry/Biochemistry department allows our students to be transformed from the simplicity of high school to the professionalism expected in the scientific community."


My basic philosophy is that students learn by doing. In my laboratory and chemistry courses I focus less on memorizing concepts and more on the process of "figuring out" chemical solutions to real world problems. As our students progress through our curriculum, the complexity and depth of the problem increases, but so does the degree of student independence in solving each new problem. In my laboratory students learn to think as analysts rather than technicians, meaning they understand why they are doing what they are doing and what their data means.

Areas of Academic Interest - My teaching responsibilities are largely in Analytical and Environmental Chemistry and Environmental Science – Analytical Chemistry (CHM 225), Analytical Chemistry Lab (CHM 226L), Environmental Chemistry (CHM 311), Environmental Chemistry Lab (311L), Instrumental Analysis (CHM 365), Instrumental Analysis Lab (CHM 366L), Instrumentation For Biologists (CHM 325) and Understanding the Environment (SCI 111, 112L).

I have also been involved in General Chemistry (CHM 145, CHM 146L, CHM 147, CHM 148L), Undergraduate Research (CHM 261, CHM 262, CHM 461, CHM 462), Chemistry Seminar (CHM 451, CHM 452), Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (CHM 445), Organic Chemistry Lab (CHM 253L, CHM 254L), Special Topics In Chemistry (CHM 447), and a variety of other non-major science courses. Additionally, I also supervise student teachers in our department (CHM 479), as well as student internships (CHM 483, CHM 484).

Lynn O'Brien

Lynn O'Brien, Ph.D.

Professor
lobrien9@naz.edu
585-389-2583
Peckham 233

Learn More about Dr. Lynn O'Brien

Education - B.S., St. John Fisher College (Chemistry); Ph.D., University of Rochester (Biochemistry)

"The Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty at Nazareth are committed to providing our students with an experience that is intellectually challenging, offers the excitement of discovery through participation in research, and provides a personal and supportive atmosphere to ensure success."

Students in my laboratory and chemistry courses demonstrate an understanding of the flow of biological information from DNA to RNA to protein. We explore the techniques of protein purification, cell culture, recombinant DNA technology (including PCR), as well as DNA and protein electrophoresis. In addition, we use computer generated molecular modeling programs to learn about the structure and function of proteins. Students will also gain experience in bioinformatics when they examine the genomes of various organisms.

Areas of Academic Interest - My teaching responsibilities are largely in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology – Biochemistry I (CHM 421), Biochemistry I Lab (CHM 421L), Biochemistry II/Molecular Biology (CHM 422), and Biochemistry II/Molecular Biology Lab (CHM 422L). I have also been involved in General Chemistry (CHM 145, CHM 146L, CHM 147, CHM 148L), Chemistry Seminar (CHM 451), Undergraduate Research (CHM 261, CHM 262, CHM 461, CHM 462), Science of Sound Lab (SCI 168L), Organic Chemistry Lab (CHM 253L, 254L), and Freshman Seminar (FRS 101). Additionally, I supervise the student teachers in our department (CHM 479).


SchoellMatthew Schoell, Ph.D. (ASCP)

Assistant Professor
mschel6@naz.edu

585-389-2587
Peckham 320


Learn More about Dr. Matthew Schoell

Education - B.S. Biochemistry, State University of New York at Geneseo, MLS (ASCP), Rochester General Hospital, Ph.D., Pharmacology, University of Rochester


Stephen T


Stephen Tajc, Ph.D.

 Assistant Professor
stajc3@naz.edu
585-389-5077
Peckham 234

Learn More about Dr. Stephen Tajc

Education - B.S., Gannon University (Chemistry); M.S., University of Rochester (Biochemistry); Ph.D., University of Rochester (Biophysics); Postdoctoral Fellow, John Hopkins University (Biophysics)

My teaching philosophy for organic chemistry is to emphasize the importance of understanding chemical reactions, rather than memorization.  I feel if a student can comprehend how the chemistry works, they will hold a greater appreciation for the overall science.  In addition, they will apply their knowledge base to more complex reactions as the course progresses.

Undergraduate research is a unique opportunity for a hands-on experience.  My research projects cover current issues and span multiple disciplines, including synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, and biophysics.  Current projects include the understanding of the fundamental binding mechanism of HIV-1 viral entry inhibitor drugs and the synthesis of small molecules that target cations in water.

Areas of Academic Interest - My teaching responsibilities include Organic Chemistry (CHM 251, CHM 252), Organic Chemistry Lab (CHM253L, CHM 254L), Undergraduate Research (CHM 160, CHM 300, CHM 301, CHM 302), and Chemistry of Drug Design (CHM 447).
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