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Chemistry Students Present at Rochester Academy of Science

  • Published: November 03, 2011

For More Information

Dr. Richard Hartman
Associate Professor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
rhartma0@naz.edu
585-389-2585

Chemistry Students Present at Rochester Academy of Science

On Saturday, October 29, 2011, students from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry presented research they have been working on with Dr. Richard Hartmann, Associate Professor at the 38th Annual Fall Scientific Paper Session at the Rochester Academy of Science.

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Presentations from Nazareth College students:


Posters
Methyl ester production of oleic acid catalyzed by tin(II)bromide

Briana Lauback and Dr. Richard Hartman

Esterification of Free Fatty Acids in Oleic Acid for Biodiesel Synthesis using Lewis Acid Tin (II) Iodide

Kristen Nichols and Dr. Richard Hartman

The Investigation of tin(II) Fluoride as a Lewis Acid Catalyst for Biodiesel Production

Emily Benton and Dr. Richard Hartman

Oral Presentations

Investigation of the Lewis Acid Catalytic Abilities of Tungsten (iv) Compounds on the Esterification of Oleic Acids

Molly Kingsley and Dr. Richard Hartman

Tin (Ii)Halides as Catalysts for the Esterification of Biodiesel

James Chambers and Dr. Richard Hartmann


This session provides a forum for Academy members, the collegiate community, and others engaged in scientific research to present the results of their investigations in an atmosphere that promotes discussion and interaction. 

Founded in 1924, Nazareth College is located on a close-knit, suburban campus in the dynamic, metropolitan region of Rochester, N.Y. The College offers challenging academic programs in the liberal arts and sciences and professional programs in health and human services, education, and management. Nazareth's strong cultures of service and community prepare students to be successful professionals and engaged citizens. The College enrolls approximately 2,000 undergraduate students and 1,000 graduate students.

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