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Upcoming Events

Gallery: Footsteps to the Future

In May 2010, a delegation from Nazareth College visited the lands held sacred by the three Abrahamic faiths. Nazareth staff and faculty, and Rochester community professionals, historians, and religious leaders—participated in a venture called Walking in the Footsteps of the Prophets.

  1. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  2. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  3. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  4. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  5. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  6. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  7. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  8. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  9. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  10. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  11. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY
  12. Footsteps to the Future – Nazareth College, Rochester, NY

International Understanding Conference 2010

Rochester's faith and community leaders share their beliefs about the interfaith movement and the significance of the 2010 IUC.

Center

The Brian and Jean Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue offers a number of programs to the community, all designed to promote unity and understanding of both the self and of the global community.

 

1 * Sacred Texts and Human Contexts: Poverty and Wealth in the  Sacred Texts of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

 

 Sacred Text Poster - Book.jpg

International Conference June 9-10, 2014

 at

Fatih University, Istanbul Turkey

and  Site Visits to sacred spaces in Turkey

June 11-14, 2014

 

At a time of this growing gap between rich and poor, how do  Jews, Christians and Muslims view and interpret their sacred texts in reference to poverty and wealth throughout  their religious history.      We invite you to our second international symposium  at which we seek to explore the role of Abrahamic religions in the dynamic relationship between wealth and poverty as it exists in individuals  lives and in nations. Please submit your proposals for a presentation or panel, or as questions you hope to see this symposium should address. We encourage submissions from social scientists, historians as well as scholars in theology and religious studies in particular. For detail on the conference go to its website: http://www.naz.edu/interfaith-studies-and-dialogue/sacred-texts-and-human-contexts

 

To view recordings of some of our recent events, visit our Resources page.

 

2. * THE INSTITUTE FOR THE RESEARCH OF THE HOLOCAUST & CHRISTIANITY AT THE JOHN WESLEY THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE (Budapest) and

 THE HICKEY CENTER FOR INTERFAITH STUDIES AND DIALOGUE ATNAZARETH COLLEGE (Rochester, New York)

INVITATION & CALL FOR PAPERS

From KamenEtsk Podolsk to Auschwitz

AN INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE COMMEMORATING THE HUNGARIAN HOLOCAUST 

October 12-14, 2014

The Institute for the Holocaust & Christianity at the John Wesley Theological College  

in cooperaton with the Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue at Nazareth College of Rochester present a joint conference in commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the destruction of Hungarian Jewry.

We are pleased to invite interested scholars and the public to share their historical, cultural and scholarly interpretations and analyses of this tragic event. 

Presentations can address, but are not limited to, the following topics

  • The history of anti-semitism between 1920 and 1944
  • The first chapter of the Hungarian Holocaust: the 1941 deportation to Galicia
  • The Final Solution ijn Hungary:  1944
  • The Roma Holocaust
  • Jehovah Witnesses, homosexuals, political opponents of the regime
  • Comparative analysis of the Holocaust
  • Rescue and Resistance
  • The Holocaust and the Church
  • Personal narratives about the Holocaust
  • Post-Holocaust in Hungary: from 1945 to the present

Simultaneous translation will be provided in English, French, and German

The John Wesley Theological College views as its mission the commemoration and perpetuation of the historical memory of the Holocaust. It is engaged in the evaluation and re-evaluation of the various manifestations of the Holocaust.  It dedicates special efforts to the study and commemoration of a unique chapter of the Hungarian Holocaust: the 1941 deportation of Jews to Galicia and the subsequent massacre of many of them in Kamenetsk Podolsk and elsewhere.

As the co-sponsor of this international conference, Nazareth College and its Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue is dedicated to the power of religious understanding and the promotion of interfaith dialogue for students and members of the local and global community for a peaceful and religiously diverse world.

Please send the abstract of your presentation to theol@wjlf.hu

Location: The conference will be held in the John Wesley Theological College, 11 Dankó St. VIII. Budapest,

Map: http://www.oktatas.uni.hu/keret.cgi?/dankoutca.htm

For additional information, please communicate via email with Dr. Tamas Majsai: theol@wjlf.hu  or call +36-1- 210-5400, ext. 137. 

In the United Sates you may contact Dr. George Eisen: geisen1@naz.edu or call 585-389-2370.

 

 

Recent Events

Event Archive

For less recent events, view our Hickey Center Event Archive

2010

The Hickey Center is gaining national attention.

Similar to Hickey Center seminars for teachers at Rochester, NY area, a seminar for social and global studies teachers of Northern Virginia will also be held at Fairfax Institute, Herndon, VA. This is the Hickey Center's first ever teachers seminar in Northern Virginia!

Date: Dec. 1, 2010

Seminar on Teaching and Understanding World Religions (panel discussion)

This was a half-day workshop intended to inform teachers from both private and public schools (all grade levels) in the rituals and holidays of world religions. The needs and viewpoints of teachers involved with teaching world religions was tracked, as well as their expectations for their students. The program is vital for teachers in understanding the beliefs of a religiously diverse classroom and global community. Open for public as well, open the flyer for more information: holidays

Date: Nov.22, 2010

Forgiveness, Reconciliation and Peace making in the Abrahamic Religions

Given the world's current divisions and conflicts that are based on political, religious, or cultural beliefs and affiliations, it is becoming increasingly urgent for scholars, faith leaders and the lay and secular communities to think restorative justice and possible action plans whose goal is to mediate and minimize the effects of these misunderstandings. A valuable tool in this effort is interfaith dialogue in the context of academic conferences that focus on themes central to the issues of global injustice, religious conflicts and cultural clashes. This seminar will focus on the theory and application of forgiveness, reconciliation and peace making in Christianity, Judaism and Islam with a special emphasis on the holy scriptures of each faith. The seminar will be examining the past, analyzing the present and looking towards the future with hope. Please participate and open the flyer for more information, please open: forgiveness Date: November 8 2010

Training of the Trainers: A Certificate Program on World Religions

A week-long annual summer workshop planned to introduce the participant to the practices and faiths of the religious traditions of the world. The program will feature activities created to introduce knowledge of beliefs, topical discussions focused on moral imperatives and communal organization, and visits to religious centers of faith to better understand worship. For more information, please open the linked program here.

Date: July 12- 16, 2010

The Next Generation: Living Together in a Religiously Pluralistic Society

Students from diverse religious backgrounds will come together for this annual week long conference. Workshops and seminars will educate and inform participants about religious traditions from around the world, focusing on the importance of interfaith knowledge in a religiously pluralistic society. The students will visit religious places of worship and participate in social and cultural sharing.

For more information please open the attachment: Next Generation 2010 Flier and Registration

Date: July 19- 23, 2010

Co-Sponsored by: Rochester Community Foundation: Civic Engagement Program and IIIT at Herdon, VA

Walking in the Footprints of the Prophets: An Interfaith Journey to Discover Our Spiritual Roots in the Holy Land

A select group of professionals, historians, and religious leaders journeyed to lands held sacred by the three Abrahamic faiths. On this extraordinary journey, we traveled to many of the region's most sacred sites: wandered the storied streets of Jerusalem, Nazareth, and Bethlehem; sailed on the waters of the Sea of Galilee; and gazed upon the breathtaking beauty of Jerusalem's Old City from the Mt. of Olives. While in the Holy Land, we benefited from the wisdom of scholars who are experts in Judaism, Islam, and Christianity from Nazareth College as well as Israeli and Palestinian educational institutions. Together with these scholars, we engaged in rich discussions with Jews, Muslims, Christians, Druze, and Bedouins of the region. Each day we participated in the most profound of human activities: seeking meaning for today and tomorrow through the spiritual legacy and ongoing presence of the Abrahamic traditions in religious, social, and historical contexts. From Israel, we flew to majestic Istanbul on the Bosporus Strait to visit the Blue Mosque, Hagia Sofia, and Topol Palace. Our exploration continued as we dialogue with scholars and local residents on topics ranging from pluralism within contemporary Islam to the relationship of secularity and religious identity in modern Turkey. The trip drew to a close with an exploration of the mystical within the Abrahamic faiths and an enchanting evening of Darveesh music and dance.

Dates: May 20 - 30, 2010 Israel and May 30-June 2, Istanbul Turkey * VIEW PARTICIPANT'S BLOG

Hickey Center Interfaith Understanding Conference

April 11-13, 2010. The innovative concept of IUC 2010 will allow to customize your conference experience. Participate in interactive workshops and roundtable discussions, visit film series and discover how others experience and live their faith through diverse practices. Explore spirituality through music, art, comedy, dance, and meditation. Connect with other advocates; join a discussion group, create an impromptu session, or network at mealtime. Together we will create a roadmap for peaceful coexistence.

Learn More:

  • View conference pictures
  • Interfaith Understanding Conference 2010
  • Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue

2011

Islam and the Challenge of Modernity: Understanding the Qur'an in a Contemporary Context

Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011 Nazareth College, Otto A. Shults Community Center, Forum

Speakers:

1. 2:00 PM: Qur'anic Ethics and the Challenge of Contemporary Radicalism

M. Ashraf Adeel, PhD, Professor of Philosophy and Qur'anic study at Kutztown University, Former Vice-Chancellor of Hazara University, Pakistan.

2. 3:30 PM: Qur'an, Women, and Modernity: from the Women Perspectives

Vivienne SM Angeles, PhD, Professor of Religious Studies at La Salle University, past president of the Study of Islamic Societies.

3. 4:30 PM: Qur'anic Concept of Interfaith Dialogue and Peaceful Coexistence in our Pluralistic World

Scott Alexander, PhD, Professor and Director of the Catholic-Muslim Studies Program, Catholic Theological Union, Chicago.

4. Dinner with Speakers: 5:30PM, By reservation

5. Panel Discussion and Q & A with Speakers: 7:00PM

For more information, see the following flyer.

Perception of the Holocaust in Modern Hungarian Political Discourse

Speaker: Dr. Tamas Stark, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Date and Time: October 20, 2011, 7:00 PM Location: Nazareth College, Otto A. Shults Center Forum

For more information, open the flyer

Walking on the Footsteps of the Prophets: Discovering your Spiritual Roots
An Interfaith journey to the Holy Land and Turkey

May 25 - June 9, 2012

First Information Session Held: Wednesday, October 19, at 12noon, Nazareth College, Golisano Academic Center, Room 38

Finding G-d - Locating Ourselves and the "Other" in a Post-Holocaust World
A Seminar on Religion and Contemporary Issues

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Dr. Michael Dobkowski

Date: Tuesday, September 13, 2011, Time: 7:00 - 8:30pm

Place: Nazareth College Shults Community Center, Forum

Brief Introduction: Dr. Michael Dobkowski is a Professor of Religious Studies with specialties in Judaism and Holocaust Studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges and is a visiting Professor for the Fall Semester 2011 at Nazareth College of Rochester. He holds an MA and PhD from New York University. He is an author of many articles and books. Some related to the topic are: The Politics of Indifference: A Documentary History of Holocaust Victims in America, University Press of America, 1982, The Tarnished Dream: The Basis of American Anti-Semitism, Greenwood Publishing Group, 1979 and Co-author of: Nuclear Weapons, Nuclear States and Terrorism, Sloane Publishing, 2006.

For further information, please see the event's flyer.

Remembering 9/11 and Moving Forward Together
The Joining of Many Faiths, Many Perspectives

Date and Time: Sunday, September 11, 2011, 4:00 PM

Location: George Eastman House, 900 East Avenue, East Vista Side Lawn Rain Location: Dryden Theater, George Eastman House

Music - Poetry - Readings - Prayers

Sponsored by the Faith Communities of Rochester, NY

The Next Generation: Living Together in a Multi-Religious Society
Interfaith Encounter

Date: July 18 - 22, 2011 Location: Nazareth College, Golisano Room 131

This week-long immersion program is designed for students in grades 9 through 12 from school districts within Monroe County and the surrounding area, as well as from local places of worship. Youth will take part in this experience and will engage in learning world religions and interfaith dialogue as they go through the program together.

For more information, please read the following document.

Train the Trainers in Understanding World Religions and Interfaith Relations

Date and Time: July 11 - 15, 2011, 2:30PM - 8:00PM

Location: Nazareth College, Golisano Room 122

This week long non-credit certificate course is planned to Train the Trainers, professionals, business people, religious leaders, social workers and all those who are engaged in dealing with the other. Living in this global world, it is essential for a successful career to know the faith and practices of the people you are dealing with.

For more information on the course and registration, please read the following document.

Walking in the Footsteps of the Prophets
An Interfaith Journey in the Holy Land and Turkey

May 25 - June 9, 2011

An extraordinary journey to some of the most sacred sites of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

View 2011's itinerary here.

Book Discussion:
Title: Reclaiming Beauty for the Good of the World: Muslim & Christian Creativity as Moral Power

Author: Dr. George Dardess and Dr. Peggy Rosenthal

Date and time: May 18, 2011, 7:00-8:30PM

Place: Nazareth College, Golisano Building Room 38

Co-Sponsored by: Center for Spirituality

For further information, please see the event's flyer.

World Religions: Beliefs and Practices
A Seminar for School Teachers in Northern Virginia

When: May 4, 2011, 4:00-6:30PM Where: At the Fairfax Institute of the International Institute of Islamic Thought (IIIT), 500 Grove Street, Suite 200, Herndon, VA 20170

Speakers: Smt. Bhavna Shindo Hurley (Durga Temple of VA), Father Don Rooney (Catholic Diocese of Arlington), Donny Kirsch, PhD (JCRC of Greater Washington), Muhammad Shafiq, PhD (Professor and Dir. of the Hickey Center), and Rev. Kaz Nakata (Ekoji Buddhist temple, Fairfax Station, VA)

Certificate of participation will be awarded. Registration is $13.00 includes light supper and free 2011 interfaith calendar. The Program is sponsored by Nazareth College of Rochester, the Hickey Center, and the Fairfax Institute of Herndon, VA. For further information, see the following flyer.

Understanding Rituals of Dying and Death in World Religions: A Seminar for Nurses

When: March 23, 2011 from 5:00-8:15

Where: Monroe Community Hospital , Auditorium A & B, 435 East Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14620, please register by 3/16 and open the file for more information.

At the conclusion of the seminar, you will identify key vocabulary words of dying and death in world religions, learn about rituals of dying and death in each of the major world religions and identify common emotional, cognitive, physical and behavioral manifestations of grief by various religious groups.

Presenters: Rasheeda Ahmad (Islam), Christine Bochen (Christianity), Rabbi Sandra Katz (Judaism), Anthony Cerulli (Hinduism and Buddhism).

Global Citizenship
The Next Generation Living in a Pluralistic World

Date: March 15th, 2011

Hosted by the Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue at Nazareth College.

A daylong conference geared toward high school students, designed to give the future leaders of our world the tools to respond to intolerance, improve religious literacy, and possess the etiquette required to work in a pluralistic world. For more information open the brochure

The conference was great success. 17 schools with 300 high school students and 109 teachers,volunteers and speakers participated. The schools are very interested to have this type of conference a yearly event of the Hickey Center.

For more information, please see the event's brochure or email globalcitizenship@naz.edu

Book discussion:
Title: Destiny Disrupted: A History of the World Through Islamic Eyes

Author: Tamim Ansary

Discussion Date: January 19, 2011 at 7:00-8:30PM

Where: Nazareth College, Golisano Building Room 38

Facilitator: The Rev. Gordon V. Webster, Hickey Center Member of the Advisory Board and Interim Senior Pastor at Lake Avenue Baptist Church

2012

  • Global Citizenship Conference: The Next Generation Living in a Pluralistic World, March 12, 2013

is a full-day conference geared toward high school students, designed to give the future leaders of our world the tools to respond to intolerance, improve religious literacy, and possess the etiquette required to work in a pluralistic world.

Participating students will:

Become more aware of the diversity of cultural and religious traditions & belief systems that exist and how they shape people's lives. Learn about a religious tradition/belief system with which they are unfamiliar, helping them to gain understanding and dispel stereotypes. Encounter a safe environment where they can become aware of, and dialogue about, issues of religious intolerance that have occurred in their schools and communities. Become more aware of healthy ways of responding to conflict in order to better promote understanding. Learn some fundamental guidelines and etiquette to help them interact respectfully in a pluralistic society.

Our next conference is on March 12, 2013 at Nazareth College, all high schools are urged to register.

  • Islamophobia: The Ideological Campaign Against Muslims

A Seminar on Religion and Contemporary Issues

Speaker: Dr. Stephen Sheehi

When: Wednesday, November 28th, 2012, 7 p.m.

Where: Gerald G. Wilmot Hall, Arts Center, Nazareth College of Rochester The Arab Spring and the Foundation of Modern Arab Identity A Seminar on Religion and Contemporary Issues

When: November 29, 2012 at 12:10 noon Where: Nazareth College, Golisano Academic Center, Room 38 Speaker: Dr. Stephen Sheehi

Free and Open to the Public

About the Speaker: Stephen Sheehi is Associate Professor of Arabic and Arab Culture and the Director of the Arabic Program at the University of South Carolina. He is also core faculty in USC’s Comparative Literature Program and the Islamic World Cultures Program. In addition to Arabic, he teaches courses on the intellectual, literary, cultural, artistic and food heritage of the modern Arabo-Islamic world. His work interrogates various modalities of self, society, and political economy within Arab modernity but takes particular interest in cultural, literary and intellectual history, photography and art of the Arab Renaissance (al-nahdah al-'arabiyah).

Is Prosperity Gospel at the Center of African American Life and Religious Experience?

A Seminar on Religion and Contemporary Issues

Speaker: Marvin McMickle, Ph.D.

President of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School

When: October 30, 2012 at 7 p.m.

Where: Nazareth College of Rochester, Otto Shults Community Center, Forum

Free and Open to the Public

About the Speaker: Born in Chicago, Dr. McMickle is a 1970 graduate of Aurora University with a B.A. in Philosophy. His alma mater also awarded him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1990. He earned a Master of Divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary in New York City in 1973 and did two additional years of graduate study at Columbia University in New York. He earned a Doctor of Ministry degree from Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey in 1983. He was awarded a Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University in 1998.

Dr. McMickle has served as the Senior Pastor of Antioch Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio since 1987. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of Cleveland State University. Dr. McMickle was Professor of Homiletics at Ashland Theological Seminary in Ashland, Ohio, where he has served on the full-time faculty since 1996. He is the author of 12 books and numerous articles.

Understanding Rituals of Dying and Death in World Religions: A Seminar for Nurses

Tuesday, October 16, 2012, 5 - 8:15 p.m.
Monroe Community Hospital, Auditorium A & B
435 East Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14620

Speakers: Rasheeda Ahmad, PhD, Christine Bochen, PhD, Rabbi Sandra Katz, PhD, Douglas R. Brooks, PhD

At the conclusion of this presentation, the participant will be able to identify key vocabulary words of dying and death in world religions, explain how dying can be considered the final stage of growth in different world religions, identify common emotional, cognitive, physical and behavioral manifestations of grief by various religions groups, describe at least two key points of care at the time of dying that would be significant for the health professional, and learn rituals of death, burial, appropriate dress and mourning in each of the major religions.

For more information, see the following flyer.

The Next Generation

Dates: Monday, August 20 to Friday, August 24, 2012

The Next Generation Youth Interfaith Encounter invites high school students to a week-long workshop event during the summer at Nazareth College to explore world religions and interfaith dialogue. This program includes of a variety of events, such as seminars, interactive workshop sessions, group discussions, site visits to local places of worship, and a community service element.

Train the Trainers 2012

Train the Trainers: Understanding World Religions and Interfaith Relations is a week-long non-credit certificate course offered each summer, designed for professionals, business people, religious leaders, social workers, and all those who are engaged in dealing with the other.

Dates: Monday, June 18 to Friday, June 22, 2012

Book Discussion: Muslims and Jews in America: Commonalities, Contentions, and Complexities

Co-edited by Reza Aslan and Aaron J. Hahn Tapper

Discussion date and time: Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Place: Nazareth College, Golisano Academic Center, Room 38

Facilitators: Rabbi Larry Kotok and Dr. Muhammad Shafiq

Global Citizenship Conference: The Next Generation Living in a Pluralistic World

March 13, 2012, 8 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Global Citizenship: The Next Generation Living in a Pluralistic World is a full-day conference geared toward high school students, designed to give the future leaders of our world the tools to respond to intolerance, improve religious literacy, and possess the etiquette required to work in a pluralistic world.

For more information on this event, please visit the conference's website.

Deities and Saints in Dialogue: Hindu-Christian Exchange in South Indian Practice

Date: Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Time: 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Location: Nazareth College, Otto A. Shults Center, Forum

For more information, please see the following flyer. Walking on the Footsteps of the Prophets: Discovering your Spiritual Roots An Interfaith Journey to the Holy Land and Turkey May/June 2013

Walking in the Footsteps of the Prophets: An Interfaith Journey in the Holy Land and Turkey invites professionals, historians, religious leaders, members of the community, and students on a trip to lands held sacred by the three Abrahamic faiths. This groundbreaking joint project of Nazareth College's Brian and Jean Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue, the Center for International Education (CIE), and the Department of Religious Studies began as an opportunity for members from the local community, which has since expanded to also include an invitation to students and paired undergraduate and graduate course offerings to allow students to fully capitalize on this powerfully moving learning experience.

On this extraordinary journey, participants visit many of the most sacred sites to Judaism, Christianity and Islam: wander the storied streets of Jerusalem, visit Bethlehem, gaze across the Sea of Galilee, behold the majestic beauty of Hagia Sophia, wonder at the grace of Sufi practices, and delight in the architectural grandeur along the shore of the Bosphorus Strait. In the Holy Land and Turkey, participants benefit from the wisdom of trip leaders from Nazareth College who are experts in Judaism, Islam, and Christianity as well as the experience and insights of scholars from educational institutions in both regions.

At each stop, lectures by tour leaders and guest speakers enhance participants' knowledge of the history and contemporary significance of the region. From exploring the literature of the Bible and Qur'an to a review of the current political climate in the Middle East, participants leave with a profound and nuanced understanding of the cultural, geographic, and spiritual legacy of these fascinating lands.

To learn more about this once in a lifetime experience, contact us at interfaith@naz.edu

2013

**The Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue & The Institute for Pluralism Present Faith-Based Initiatives of Women in the Struggle for Gender Equity and Justice

Nazareth College will host a spirited presentation and discussion of women's faith-based initiatives that have unfolded here in Rochester. Come and listen to the stories and testimony of women leaders in the Rochester movement for gender equity and justice.

Where: Medaille Formal Lounge, Nazareth College When: March 25, 2014 at 7:00 PM Presenters: Almeta Whitis: Founder/Artistic Director Chanticleer Productions/Inner Voice Theater, Rochester, New York. Melanie May: John Price Crozer Professor of Theology at Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, Rochester, New York. Joyce Herman: Founding Director (Director Emeritus) National Coalition Building Institute/Rochester Chapter.

Moderator: Dr. Shirley Sommers, Director of the Institute for Pluralism Open and Free

  • Global Citizenship: The Next Generation Living in a Pluralistic World is a full-day conference geared toward high school students, designed to give the future leaders of our world the tools to respond to intolerance, improve religious literacy, and possess the etiquette required to work in a pluralistic world.

When and Where: Nazareth College, Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Participating students will:

Become more aware of the diversity of cultural and religious traditions & belief systems that exist and how they shape people's lives. Learn about a religious tradition/belief system with which they are unfamiliar, helping them to gain understanding and dispel stereotypes. Encounter a safe environment where they can become aware of, and dialogue about, issues of religious intolerance that have occurred in their schools and communities. Become more aware of healthy ways of responding to conflict in order to better promote understanding. Learn some fundamental guidelines and etiquette to help them interact respectfully in a pluralistic society.

Pioneered in 2011, the Global Citizenship conference (GCC) has become an annual event and will next be held in the spring, on March 2014. Watch this space for further details!

For more information on this conference, please watch the video below from the inaugural 2011 conference and e-mail us at interfaith@naz.edu *Faith Based Initiatives in the African American Struggle for Freedom and Justice in the Greater Rochester Area

Rochester activists Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony were essential to Rochester's reputation as a center in the struggle to end slavery and win the right to vote for women. The legacy informed Rochester's role in the 20th century struggle for justice. On February 4, 2014, Nazareth College will host a spirited discussion of faith-based initiatives that unfolded here. Review, analysis of the events, stories and promises that unfolded here will be led by Rev. Dr. John Walker, scholar and Pastor, Christian Friendship Baptist Church; Rev. Dr. Marvin McMickle, President, Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, and Imam Hanif Abdul-Wahid, Rochester native and activist, and founding member, Rochester-Monroe County Freedom Trail Commission

When and Where: Nazareth College, Otto Shults Community Center, Forum on February 4, 2014, 7:00PM

Moderator: Dr. David Anderson, Visiting Community Scholar, Nazareth College

  • Milestones of Rochester Multi-Religious Interfaith Journey: Inter Generational Experience

Join us for an engaging evening of dialogue where we revisit the significant and life changing moments of interfaith work in Rochester's past and share hopes about our future. The first half of the program will feature an organic give and take with our panel and moderator. In the second half our panel will join the audience seated at round tables for small group discussions. Panel discussion Moderator: Doug Mandelaro

Panelists: Rabbi Alan Katz, Rev. Dr. Denise Yarbrough, V. V. Raman, Isobel Goldman, Frank Howard, Ali Nahas, Rev. Gordon Webster, Rev. James Paul Womack, Farzana Islam, Eileen O'Connor Casey, Rev. Lawrence Hargrave, Fatima Bawany, Richard Gilbert, Dr. Susan Nowak, Lynne Boucher and Nora Bradbury-Haehl, Meghan Robinson

Time and Location: Nazareth College, Otto Shults Community Center, Forum, Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 7:00PM

  • Topic: Science and Religion in the 21st Century: Are Human Beings wired Spiritually Speaker: Dr. V. V. Raman

Respondents: Rabbi Leonardo Bitran (Judaism), Rev. Dr. Denise Yarbrough (Christianity), Dr. Shakeel Shareef (Islam) and Dr. Uma Gupta (Hinduism)

Time and Location: Nazareth College, Otto Shults Community Center, Forum, Wednesday, October 9, 2013 at 7PM

About the Speaker: Varadaraja V. Raman is the Professor Emeritus of Physics and Humanities of Rochester Institute of Technology. He has a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics, Masters in Mathematics and Bachelors in Physics. He is teaching several courses on Science, Human Values, Technology, and Society; He has written many books, texts, manuals, articles and scholarly papers. His works include: Energy: In Nature and for Man, The World of Science and Technology, Glimpses of Ancient Science and Scientists, Scientific Perspectives, and many more.

  • The Brian and Jean Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue

Center in cooperation with the Center for Interfaith Affairs, Peace Islands Institute

Peace Islands announce

Sacred Texts and Human Contexts:

A Symposium on the Role of the Sacred Texts of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in Uniting and Dividing Humanity

Sacred Text Poster - Book.jpg

June 23-25 2013

Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue Nazareth College of Rochester 4245 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14618

At a time of division and hostility, do Jews, Christians, and Muslims interpret their religious traditions - in particular, their sacred texts - in ways that intensify or reduce hostility and division? This symposium will bring together scholars to explore this question.

We encourage papers and panels that deal with the general theme of the symposium - the role of sacred texts in uniting and dividing people. This general theme may be subdivided into these three questions:

What features of these sacred texts and their interpretations divide or unite humanity? What social, political, national, tribal, economic, and colonial contexts have affected the hermeneutics and rhetoric associated with these texts? Might levels of literacy, conceptions of gender roles, and notions of sexuality play a part? What elements of these interpretations nourished times when Jews, Christians, and Muslims lived as good neighbors or provided a context for conflict resolution? How might those times suggest models for the future? For example, do the texts have interpretations that nourish the current interfaith movement?

On the next page we suggest some questions conference participants might address. We invite you to submit other questions to this evolving list, either as parts of your proposals for a presentation or panel, or as questions you hope to see the symposium address. We encourage submissions from anthropologists, sociologists, and historians as well as scholars in religious studies.

We will continue our discussion in a follow-up conference in Turkey in Summer 2014, with the generous support of the Peace Islands Institute. Selected presentations will be expanded and revised, in the light of our discussions in Rochester, for presentation at Fatih University, Istanbul June 9 to 12, 2014. Further details about the 2014 conference will be added to this site as they become available.

Below find links to pages describing more fully the topics we propose, the process for submitting proposed presentations and panels, details of registration, housing, and food options, a very preliminary schedule, descriptions of the sponsoring groups, and an account of what to see and do in the Rochester area, which abounds in attractions for families - in addition to the included trip to Niagara Falls at the end of the conference.

Conference Topics and Process for Submitting Proposals

Registration, Housing, and Meals

Schedule

Who We Are - The sponsoring entities

Planning Committee

Rochester Area Attractions

Conference Poster

The conference is administered by the Brian and Jean Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue in coordination with the Center for International Education, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Religious Studies, all at Nazareth College, and the Center for Interfaith Affairs of the Peace Islands Institute.

Institutional partners include: Catholic-Muslim Studies Program at Catholic Theological Union (Chicago), Department of Religious Studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, International Institute of Islamic Thought - the Fairfax Institute, Department of Theology of the University of Notre Dame, Dialogue Institute at Temple University, Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, Northeastern Seminary at Roberts Wesleyan College, Department of Religion and Classics at the University of Rochester, Department of Religious Studies at St. John Fisher College, the Department of Religion in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University, the Religion and Conflict Transformation Program of Boston University School of Theology, the Parliament of World Religions, Department of Religion at the Chautauqua Institutions, and the Brennan Goldman Institute of Rochester.

Conference Topics and Process for Submitting Proposals

Our three main questions on the introductory page - the divisive and uniting qualities of interpretive responses to sacred texts, the contexts that affect those responses, and the models for future harmony provided by successful interfaith communities in the past - invite many other questions. We hope to bring together anthropologists, economists, historians, political scientists, and sociologists, in addition to textual scholars, theologians, and specialists in religious studies.

Some of the questions that seem to us to seek an answer are listed below the procedures for submitting proposals. The list is a dynamic one: as you submit your questions, whether as parts of proposals for presentation or as questions you wish to hear discussed, we will add them to this list.

Procedures for submitting proposals

We look forward to your proposals for papers and/or panel presentations. These proposals (attachments in .docx format preferred) should be sent to hickeycenter.conference@gmail.com with the subject line, "Proposal Submission." The deadline for all proposals is January 31, 2013. Selected papers will be published.

Proposals will be reviewed when they are received. You will be informed of acceptance within a month. The proposal should be no more than 550 words. In addition you should send a 225-word resume that presents your expertise in the area of your presentation, as well as your address, telephone number, and email address. No proposals will be accepted after January 31, 2013. Your entire presentation will be due May 1, 2013. Acceptance of your presentation for publication will be sent September 25, 2013.

Questions Seeking Answers: Some Possibilities

Do the material forms and ritual uses of scriptures create common ground between religious groups or do they mark antagonizing differences between communities? How do the texts’ visions of sacred places/lands bring harmony/disharmony to a pluralistic world? What vision of harmony conditions our reading of the texts? What vision of disharmony conditions our reading of the texts? Is the unity or division evidenced in the texts based on belief, ritual, morals, or polity? Do religious people adapt to the text or does their reading of the text adapt to their wishes? What do we mean by text? As it is written? As it is spoken? As it is “used” in communal gatherings of worship and prayer? What were the original purposes of the text in each of the religions? What is the role of translations of texts in unifying and/or dividing those in a religion? How do claims of exclusive authority play out in the sacred texts of each of the Abrahamic traditions? How does each textual tradition prioritize that tradition in the eyes of God vis a vis other humans? What are the various methods of interpretation used by each faith tradition in understanding its sacred texts? What are the various methods of preaching used to communicate these meanings to each religious community? What passages vex interfaith dialogue, and what passages contain elements that might encourage fruitful discussions across the faith traditions? To what extent are any of the traditionally authoritative textual hermeneutics and rhetorics open to contemporary Western academic methods of textual interpretation? To what extent are particular interpretative traditions accepted as authoritative in each tradition? Are these interpretive traditions open to contemporary academic methods of textual interpretation? How are the sacred texts related to the divergent versions of the conception of the Household of God - the nation of Israel, the realm(s) of Christendom, and the Umma of Islam? What is at stake in responses to the passages that define and prescribe defenses of each conception? Is there scriptural warrant in the traditions for an overarching conception of the household of God? What social groups or movements of the past might we take as inspiring or cautionary examples of textual interpretation and application to social life? Schedule Schedule

Note: This schedule is tentative. As proposals for talks and panels are received, the plenary sessions may be readjusted. SUNDAY JUNE 23, 2013 3:00 PM Registration

4:30 PM Opening Remarks

5:30 PM Plenary panel Moderator: Nathan Kollar

Rabbi Rachel Mikva, Chicago Theological Seminary Leonard Swidler, Temple University Muzammil H. Siddiqi, Fiqh Council of North America

7:00 PM Dinner and opening address: Moderator:

Father Tomas Michel, Georgetown University

MONDAY JUNE 24, 2013 7:00 AM Breakfast 8:30-10:00 AM SESSION ONE

Teaching and Learning: Scriptural Reasoning Moderator: Michael Dobkowski

William W. Young Listening Through Texts

Steven Kepnes Scriptural Reasoning as a Method of Inter-Religious Dialogue Rabbi Gilbert Rosenthal

The Doctrine of Umot Ha-Olam Salvation and the Jewish concept of Hasidei

Thematic Readings: Chosen-ness, God, Creation Moderator: Susan Novak

Peter J. Haas From Chosen to Choosing: For Whom Was the Revelation at Sinai?

Abdulla Galadari Reconciling Incarnation of God and Creation of Human Flesh: A Dialogue between the Qur'an and Bible Using Inter-textual Polysemy in Hermeneutics

Shalahudin Kafrawi Abrogation and Supersession: Exegetic Tradition on Q.S. 13:37-39 Individual and Communal Dialogue: Politics and Theology Moderator: Ibrahim Siyar

Robert F. Shedinger Jesus and Jihad: The Politics of the Sacred and Christian-Muslim Dialogue

Kenan Cetinkaya Three Contemporary Turkish Perceptions of Interfaith Dialogue

Josh Mugler The Light of Muhammad that Enlightens All: Sahl at-Tustari and Jaques Dupuis 10:00 AM Break 10:30AM-NOON SESSION TWO

Teaching and Learning: Film Moderator: Syed M. Sayeed Sharon Albert and Lora Taub-Pervispour Exploring Islam Through Film Individual and Communal Dialogue: Origins Moderator: Thomas Donlin-Smith

Jonathan Lawrence Which Came First: The Dialogue or the Trust? Reflections on Dialogue in Buffalo’s Interfaith Community?

Ariana Patey God Made Man

George Heyman Adam and Eve in the Garden: Iblis, a Talking Snake, and God Gender: Islam and Christianity Moderator: Melonie May

Meriem El Haitami Feminist Readings of the Qur'an and the Production of Textual Meaning

Etin Anwar Women in the Qur'an

Suraiya IT Mary in Islamic and Christian Tradition NOON: Lunch and address: James W, Watts, Syracuse University Scriptures in Three Traditions in Three Dimensions 1:30-3:00 PM SESSION THREE

Teaching and Learning: Torah and Testament ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION: Moderator

Michael Dobkowski and Richard Salter Ritual, Worship, and Liturgy: Christians Looking Outward Moderator: Father William Graf

Denise Yarbrough Preaching the Great Commission of Matthew's Gospel: Interreligious Opportunity or Nightmare?

Demetrios E. Tonias From the Springs of Israel: The Jewish Bible and Eastern Christian Liturgy

David A. Stosur The New English Translation of the Mass Thematic Readings: Nation, Person, and Nature Moderator: Iqbal Unus

Mustafa Gokcek Qur'an as a Discursive Tool in Late Ottoman Debates on Nationalism

Zeki Saritoprak Revisiting the Qur'an's Chapter 49:13

John Kaltner Nature as Muslim: Applying a Qur'anic Concept to the Bible 3:00 PM BREAK 3:30-5:00 PM SESSION FOUR

Differing Cultures: Translation, Dialogue, Behavior Moderator Douglas Cullum

Badmus N.o. Abdulazeez Merits and Demerits of of Translated Scriptures: A Case Study of the Yoruba Translation of the Qur'an

J. Murray Watson Translation for Transformation: André Chouraqui and His Unique Contribution to Interfaith Dialogue and Friendship”

Individual and Communal Dialogue: Peace, Actions, Interpretations Moderator David Hill Pim Valkenberg Models of Peace-Oriented Interpretation of the Scriptures

Hussam S. Timani Reading Scriptures in the 21st Century: Negotiating the Qur'an

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Differing Cultures: Sex, Contrition, Conversion Moderator Rebecca Mays Michael D. Calabria Zualaykhā and Aseneth: Pagan Paragons of Contrition and Conversion Jonah Yunus Kumek Effect of Islamic Sacred Teachings in the Life of American Muslims Fahad Alhomoudi Remarks on the Second Oldest Hadith Manuscript, Nuskhat Waki B. al Jarrah al-Ruassi

Thematic Readings: Spirituality and Interpretations Moderator Lawrence Hargrave

Julianne Hazen Sacred Texts and the Sufis in New York

Chris Van Gorder Freirean Insights for Muslim and Christian Interactions

Andrii Krawchuk Responses to a Common Word: Scripture as a Basis for Orthodox-Muslim Dialogue

Ghada Abdel Moniem Ibrahim

Ideological Connotations of the inscription of Goma's Masjad in Isfahan 6:00 PM: Dinner and address The Rev. Dr. Katharine R. Henderson, President Auburn Theological Seminary Our Lives as Text and Context: Building a Multifaith Movement for Justice 8:00 PM Abrahmaic Musical Traditions: a Concert at the Chapel, Golisano Building TUESDAY JUNE 25, 2013 7:00 AM Breakfast 8:30-10:00 AM SESSION FIVE

Individual and Communal Dialogue: Creation, the World, and God Moderator

Faith Harpci A Common Word: Global Faith and Pluralism in Islam

Hans Gustafson Vexation and Promise in the New Testament: Interpreting Pantheistic Passages and Their Implications for Interfaith Discourse

Yakir Englander From Human to Divine and Back Again: Religion as Instrument for Self-Critique and Self-Esteem Thematic Readings: Qur'anic Readings and Human Unity Moderator

S. Ali Saddiqui The Role of the Sacred Texts of Islam in Uniting but not Dividing Humanity

Scott Morrison The Interstices of Law: Equity (Istihsan) and the Qur'an

Daniel Bannoura Qur'anic Readings of the Psalms Thematic Readings: Human Hatred and Compassion Moderator

David Carlson A Post-9/11 Ethic Based on Matthew 25:31-46 and Hadith 1172

Vanessa J. Avery Humans Left Alone: The Book of Esther and the Vicious Cycle of Scapegoating

Sona Grigoryan The Status of the Gospel According to Ibn Taymiyyah 10: AM BREAK 10:30AM-NOON SESSION SIX

Differing Cultures: Interpretive Consequences Moderator

Hakan Çoruh Modern Qur'an Exegesis, the Concept of Jihad and Cross-Religious Unification

David Aune Ways of Salvation: Confessional Particularity in New Testament Exclusivist Texts

Marinus C. Iwuchukwu Navigating Between the Extremes of Exclusivism in Christian and Islamic Sacred Texts: The Case for Inclusive Pluralism Thematic Readings: Evil, Pluralism, and Institutions Moderator

Rabbi Daniel Lehrman If Brutality is Human

John McCarthy Sacred Texts and Sacred Pluralities

Romana Manzoor The Interplay Between People of Abrahamic Faiths in the Development of Theological Language and Academic Faculties NOON-2:00 PM Lunch and Concluding Plenary Dialogue Rabbi Rachel Mikva, Chicago Theological Seminary Leonard Swidler, Temple University Muzammil H. Siddiqi, Fiqh Council of North America 3:30 PM TRIP TO NIAGARA FALLS (FAMILIES ARE WELCOME)

Located between the western Finger Lakes and the Lake Ontario shoreline, Rochester, a city of over 200,000, is the center of a metropolitan area of about 1,000,000. Within the city and its immediate suburbs are cultural, entertainment, and historical attractions for individuals and families of varying interests.

The city and county maintain a park system of great interest and beauty (several examples of the landscape architecture of Frederick Law Olmsted are in Rochester). Walking and bicycle paths along the Erie Canal bisect the metropolitan area, with spurs along the Genesee River and former railway right of ways. Four major museums offer an unusual variety of things to see and learn about. The year-round musical schedule in the city (anchored by the Eastman School of Music) includes a distinguished Jazz Festival which will overlap with the conference. The influence of Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass is a part of the city's history that can be explored. Historical sites in the wider area include chances to experience the culture of Native Americans, the events leading to the founding of the Mormon churches, the birth of the Women's Suffrage movement, a glimpse at pioneer life in Western New York, and, of course Niagara Falls, the destination for an optional trip (free for conference attenders and their families).

We emphasize family-friendly attractions, hoping attendees will consider bringing their families to enjoy our area. See below for a listing of some attractions, divided by categories, and in most cases, accompanied by links to Web sites (use the browser Back button to return to this page). Museums:

George Eastman House: International Museum of Photography and Film Memorial Art Gallery Rochester Museum & Science Center and Strasenburgh Planetarium Strong National Museum of Play

Parks:

City of Rochester - Parks Durand Eastman Park and Beach Highland Park Mendon Ponds Park Ontario Beach Park Letchworth State Park Seneca Park Zoo

Historical Sites:

National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House Frederick Douglass in Rochester - "Circle of Hope" Ganondagan State Historic Site The Hill Cumorah & Other Historic Mormon Sites The Women's Rights National Historical Park Genesee Country Village & Museum Finger Lakes Winery tours

  • Train the Trainer: Understanding World Religions and Interfaith Encounters

A week long non-credit certificate course with spiritual journeys to places of worship, Monday August 12th to Friday August 16th, 2013,1:30pm to 8:30pm, at Nazareth College, Golisano Academic Center, Room # 236

This week long course is designed to Train the Trainers; professionals, business people, religious leaders, social workers and all those who are engaged in dealing with the other. Living in this global world, understanding the faith and practices of those you work with is essential for a successful career. Train the Trainers will teach you about the faith and practices of a variety of major world religions, provide the necessary tools for respectful communication, and show you how to be aware of the religious needs of the other. The course will be taught by experts of world religions with featured activities and topical discussions including interfaith relations. The course also includes visits to local places of worship to understand these faiths as they are lived. For more information, please open the link

  • The Next Generation: Living together in a Diverse Religious Society, An Interfaith Encounter: Monday, August 12 to Friday, August 16, 2013 at Nazareth College, Golisano Academic Center Room # 237 , Time 1:00- 8:00PM

This week-long immersion program is designed for students in grades 9 through 12 from school districts and places of worship in and around Monroe County. Youth from a variety of world religions will take part in this experience and will engage in learning and interfaith dialogue as they go through the program together. for more detail and registration open the link.

  • International Symposium on Sacred Texts and Human Contexts, June 23-25 2013

The Brian and Jean Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue Center in cooperation with the Center for Interfaith Affairs, Peace Islands Institute announce:

Sacred Texts and Human Contexts:

A Symposium on the Role of the Sacred Texts of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in Uniting and Dividing Humanity

June 23-25 2013

At a time of division and hostility, do Jews, Christians, and Muslims interpret their religious traditions - in particular, their sacred texts - in ways that intensify or reduce hostility and division? This symposium will bring together scholars to explore this question. For more information, please click here.

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